Tai Chi with El Centro College


Tai Chi with El Centro College

RELAX. Breathe. Move! Join us for FREE Tai Chi classes in the park. Wear loose, comfortable clothing and gym shoes.
NOTE: If the temperature is below 50 degrees at 8am this class is cancelled. 

What is Tai Chi?
Tai Chi (Tai Chi Chuan, or Tai Ji) is an internal Chinese martial art. It is known throughout the world for its slow, meditative forms and healthful benefits. Medical research has found evidence that tai chi improves balance and general mental health. The slow, rhythmic motions stretch the muscles and joints, stimulate balance, coordination, mental focus, and promote overall health and well-being. Although Tai Chi in America is mainly studied for the health benefits, at advanced levels it is an effective form of self-defense focusing on neutralizing or redirecting the force of an opponent. This class provides an introduction to the practice of Tai Chi for physical and personal development. It is a small sample of the many Continuing Education and Credit Hour programs available to the community at El Centro College.

About the Instructor:
Michael Braitsch is a professor at El Centro College, where he teaches Yang Style Tai Chi and Self Defense classes. He is a black sash (black belt) instructor of Tien Shan Pai Kung Fu and the internal arts (including Tai Chi and Qi gong). As a student of Shiye Martin Ware and Shifu April Nordman, he became an accomplished fighter, competitor, and internationally certified referee. He has the patience and communication skills needed to help beginner students succeed, as well as the experience necessary to push advanced students to new levels of success.

starting on 2017-12-16 08:00:00

Address:
Klyde Warren Park
Downtown Dallas
75202 Dallas
United States

Sprint Planning & Tracking HD


Sprint Planning & Tracking HD

Sprint Planning & Tracking

CMMI for Development: Implementation Guide


CMMI for Development: Implementation Guide

Product Description

Apply best practices and proven methods to ensure a successful CMMi implementation. This practical book shows you which implementation hurdles to avoid and which CMMi best practices to apply in your work areas. You’ll experience how easy the CMMi practice description is and how quickly and efficiently it can be implemented into your work processes.

CMMi is a popular software process improvement model developed by the US department of Defence Software Engineering Institute (Carnegie Mellon University). This model is extensively used by software professionals and organizations worldwide. CMMI for Development: Implementation Guide is a step by step guide to change the way people interpret and implement CMMi in their organizations.

What You’ll Learn
  • Use itDetect to rectify common mistakes
  • Define your processes using CMMi
  • Collect improvement data
  • Prepare your work area for CMMi appraisal
Who This Book Is For
Program Managers, Project Managers, Development Leads, Test Leads, Quality professionals, and Training professionals.

Price: $24.30

  • CMMI for Development Implementation Guide

Kenpo Black Belts – Tell Your Story


A few years back, I released the 1st volume of The Kenpo Continuum. The book is a collection of stories about kenpo lovers who have dedicated their every spare moment, or at least spent a many years, constantly learn Kenpo karate. I am currently in the process of composing the second volume of the book and am seeking new stories to add. To qualify, you have to be be a black belt in Kenpo Karate and have at least ten years of active training. Your previous instructors isnt important, as far as qualifying, because I am looking for kenpo practitioners from all different lineages. This isnt about horn-tooting or showing off, its about preserving our Kenpo roots and recording where the many branches have gone. The following is my journey, as included in the first volume.

My Kenpo tale started in the year 1979, when I was 11 years old. My good friend at the time, Roben, was involved in a kenpo class and because I My idea worked out; we were close friends for years.) I knew nothing about the style, but was blessed to end up in an American Kenpo school, which took place at the Belmont, CA YMCA. My instructor was Vinton Koklich. I trained at that school for a little more than 4 yrs. until my family moved up to Sacramento. That class was once per week and because I never practiced, I left that school an advanced purple belt. But — I was addicted. Id received my initial taste of American kenpo and there was no going back.

I took time away from kenpo to become adjusted to the move, but when a year or so had passed, I began my search for a Kenpo karate school. American kenpo is one of those things that gets addicting in every way. Its hard to keep away from it. I also discovered that there was no other type of exercise that didnt bore me to tears. I tested the waters at a few schools till I discovered a good school I liked. One day, when I was stretching before class, I saw a black belt there warming up, who I had never met. I said hello , then told him my name, after which I continued with my kata warm up.

He watched me intently for a bit, walked out of the room, returned, took my practice sheet, and told me to follow him. He brought me into one of the small curtained areas where instructors did private lessons, then announced, Im your instructor now. Uh, okay. His name was Ray Arquilla.

I developed a love with American kenpo from Vinton, but I feel I formed my passion for Kenpo karate because of Ray. He fixed my basics and showed me how to train. And BOY, did we train! I was 17, so, at the time, the three hr. twice-weekly workouts were easier then. I was , as it happened, the only woman in the class, so nearly killed myself keep pace with the guys. We undertook some insane workouts. One particular one that I remember specifically was the fivein the morning, crack-of-dawn, November, up-in-the-hills, on a Sundaytorture-session, near the river. Near the end of the killer workout, he said, I want you to do what I do no hesitation. Am I understood? YES SIR! Then, he charged down the hill, through the brush then went flying into the ice cold river! I must have been a little nuts then as well because I took the dive with only a tiny hesitation. (GOD, I DESPISE cold water!) Objectively-speaking, it was a very brief swim, but I still almost froze in place. The guy helping us on the other side laughingly said that my head poked up so high out of river that I strongly resembled a turtle.

It was great though. I stayed at that school, learning a lot more than I can put into words, for close to 2 years.

I later attended the school of Bob Liles for roughly one and a half years, when I was around 20), then later left for several years to attend college and other obligations.

One of the benefits to being at his school was that I was able to attend a seminar given by, and being an uke for, Mr. Ed Parker Sr., the previous year before he passed. I later moved down to Marin County, where I attended Marin Kenpo, training with Richard LaFave. He has since passed, but I learned a whole lot during my brief time as his student. I was forced to leave prior to his passing because I developed Hodgkins Disease (Lymphoma). I was deathly ill for about 18 months, with another year or 2 for overall healing. I tried several different Kenpo schools throughout my healing, but none felt like home for me.

Eventually, I came across Darryl Liners school, at which I studied for about a year and a half, leaving after I found a bun in my oven. One kid turned into two – (it is like magic) so before I knew it, it had been 6 yrs. that I had been away from my art. During that time, I had grown to be resigned to never receiving my black belt. When my son was two, however, I started to feel the itch. I was tired of feeling like an overweight, dowdy lump. (Child-rearing can have that affect on a person, especially a work-from-home mom.)

I returned to Liners school, where I eventually was awarded my black belt. The quest for black belt only took two and a half decades (total). I tested in front of a large panel at Larry Tatums first Las Vegas camp, in 2004. I felt absolutely ready and had trained solidly for the test, but, Murphys Law kicked in, so my 220lb. instructor landed on my knee sideways at the end of one of the first few techniques for the test. I hobbled through the rest of the test (as well as the next half a year). Not the awe-inspiring impression I had hoped to make!

As soon as I was promoted though, I started to teach a beginners adult class. Id always assisted at all of the schools Id gone to ever since blue belt, but this class was all my own. I loved it.

The only difficult thing for me about going to that school was that I had nobody to with. I did a whole lot of Air Kenpo. I could be devastating to the air like nothing youve ever seen. Before long, I discovered a great Kenpo forum (www.kenpotalk.com) at which I discovered kenpo practitioners of a similar mindset and one of like-location: Through the forum, I met Tara Turnbull, who lives only 45 min. from me. The school was smack dab between us, so I invited her to join me for a workout and help teach my class. As she was also a well practiced Air-Kenpoist, she was excited about the chance.

As it turned out, she is a kick-butt Kenpoist as well. We rapidly became friends and not long after my second degree black test, decided to leave and start a new school. Sacramento Kenpo Karate was born.

I was without an instructor for some time, but once having attended numerous kenpo camps along with seminars, I found a large group of kenpo enthusiasts who offered me help. The Majority of my instructors have been in the Tatum lineage and Taras has been from the Planas lineage, so we have a good deal to draw from. Our dojo (and me personally) were very fortunate to have had Ron Nakamoto join us in 2008. He is currently a 4th degree black belt in American Kenpo and has not only enhanced the quality of our school, but of my personal life too.

At SKK, we have made use of many different dvds, including Larry Tatums and Mike Lamberts, both of whom have had an influed on my art. Ive also found Lee Wedlake to be a wealth of generous know-how. For the last several years, Dr. Dave Crouch has been my instructor (and very good friend) and I’ve determined our kenpo karate philosophies to be in alignment. I can sincerely say I have learned more him, in my relatively-few hours of time on the mat with him, than Id learned in the many years training at my previous school. He teaches kenpo in a concept-based way, which I have then applied to each move in the system. As Dr. Dave says, Kenpo is THE WAY you move, not the moves themselves. Hes one of the the truest example of what Mr. Parker intended, that Ive ever had the pleasure of working with. In September of 2011, he honored me by kicking me to third degree black belt.

American kenpo has been tantamount in shaping and guiding my life. Kenpo has at all times been a source of strength for me. I have met some of my best friends through Kenpo (you know who you are!)

I attend camps and seminars whenever I am able, usually taking 100s of pictures at most every one. I do whatever I can to give back to the art that that means so much to me.

Our website is the Sacramento Kenpo Karate. If you you are a Kenpoist, then you are family. Join us anytime participate in a class. We would appreciate to have you.

Amy Long is a 3rd degree black belt in the art of Kenpo karate as well as the publisher of the first volume for the Kenpo Continuum. She is currently searching for new stories to add for the next volume of stories. She also is the co-owner of Sacramento Kenpo karate

Process area (CMMI)


Process area (CMMI)

The latest version of Capability Maturity Model Integration–CMMI for Development, Version 1.3—contains 22 Process Areas that describe the aspects of product development that are to be covered by organizational processes.

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Article text available under CC-BY-SA
Creative Commons image source in video

Revival of Brawl – Salem (Ganondorf) vs Ish (Wolf) – SSBB Mid Tiers Winners Finals – Smash Brawl


Revival of Brawl – Salem (Ganondorf) vs Ish (Wolf) – SSBB Mid Tiers Winners Finals – Smash Brawl

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Sprint Retrospective Meeting – CollabNet Scrum Training Part 6


Sprint Retrospective Meeting – CollabNet Scrum Training Part 6

This module covers the final meeting associated with each Sprint. In this meeting, the team reflects on the Sprint to raise its own awareness of what transpired. It ends with agreements about specific adaptations for future Sprints. Subtopics include: checking for safety, “classic” retrospectives, focused conversation principles, timeline retrospectives, reaching agreements that stick, and how to learn more about facilitation.

Integrating CMMI and Agile Development: Case Studies and Proven Techniques for Faster Performance Improvement (SEI Series in Software Engineering)


Integrating CMMI and Agile Development: Case Studies and Proven Techniques for Faster Performance Improvement (SEI Series in Software Engineering)

Product Description

Many organizations that have improved process maturity through Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI®) now also want greater agility. Conversely, many organizations that are succeeding with Agile methods now want the benefits of more mature processes. The solution is to integrate CMMI and Agile. Integrating CMMI® and Agile Development offers broad guidance for melding these process improvement methodologies. It presents six detailed case studies, along with essential real-world lessons, big-picture insights, and mistakes to avoid.

 

Drawing on decades of process improvement experience, author Paul McMahon explains how combining an Agile approach with the CMMI process improvement framework is the fastest, most effective way to achieve your business objectives. He offers practical, proven techniques for CMMI and Agile integration, including new ways to extend Agile into system engineering and project management and to optimize performance by focusing on your organization’s unique, culture-related weaknesses.

    Wicked Ones || SSGB


    Wicked Ones || SSGB

    I just watched this first episode of the show. It was amazing in my opinion.
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    Daily Scrum Meeting


    Daily Scrum Meeting